Week 11: Just past half way.

Anchor windlass platform installed and drilled. The hole upper center is for the cowl vent and the lower right hole is where one of the foot switches for the windlass will be mounted.
Anchor windlass platform installed and drilled. The hole upper center is for the cowl vent to keep the anchor locker smelling fresh and the lower right hole is where one of the foot switches for the windlass will be mounted.

This week we’re starting from the front and working back.  In sailing terms: forward to aft.  Tom fiberglassed the new platform for the windlass in place and Bill drilled the really big holes.  The platform was needed to get the chain feed from the anchor roller to the windlass level.  Nina is looking forward to having an electric windlass so that she will no longer need to be the cranking lass to get the anchor up or down.

Tape dams for the toe rail holes.
Tape dams for the toe rail holes.
Dams for toe rail holes made out of pvc pipe.
Dams for toe rail holes made out of pvc pipe. They are glued down with dabs of Bondo.

All of the holes for the toe rail got drilled out this week with a 5/8″ bit. That’s 164 holes! Drilling went much faster after Bill learned how to sharpen drill bits. The pipes work better and are faster to install than tape, and leak less than tape, at least on top.  The height helps get rid of epoxy bubbles from air escaping the wood.  We had a couple of holes that that kept on being leaky nuisances inside the cabin, but they’ll be fixed this coming weekend.

Chris put together a welding jig for the stanchions.  Marsden bent and polished all the pieces on the lathe and milling machine.
Chris put together a welding jig for the stanchions. Marsden bent and polished all the pieces on the lathe and milling machine.  These will bolt into the toe rail and the side of the hull and we will have very stiff, safe stanchions.
The bulkhead installed with fillets for glassing.
The bulkhead installed with fillets for glassing.

Nina’s bulkhead project was installed!  The pieces of wood were epoxied together with a spline and glued to the after end of the cockpit.  She also made fillets on both sides at the bottom to make fiberglassing them in place easier.  They were sanded to smooth them up for the glass cloth and resin, and sanded once the glass was in place and cured.  She was quite pleased to be told by Tom that she’d done a good job!

Glassing in progress.
Fiberglassing  in progress.
The fillet done on the starboard side.
The fillet done on the starboard side.
View of the bulkhead from the engine bed.
View of the bulkhead from the engine bed. This view will never be seen again once the fuel tank is added.  The tank will sit in front of the white area.  The post going down the middle is the rudder post.
The fuel tank.  It fits! It will block the view of the bulkhead.  It has a 60 gallon capacity.
The fuel tank. It fits! It will block the view of the bulkhead. It has a 60 gallon capacity. The angled side will be the after bottom side. (It is on its side in the photo).
The dodger glassed and the sanding begun.
The dodger edge fiberglassed and the sanding begun.

The boat is really starting to feel like it’s going back together rather than being torn apart.  That being said, we don’t have much time left to get it to a state where Tom and Chris can begin prepping for paint.  Once that starts, we’ll need other projects to work on, like the mast.